Effective services means better outcomes

When individuals don’t have access to the proper care or necessary services, their health and safety can be compromised. This is especially true for people living with mental health issues or substance use disorders (SUDs). Jail diversion efforts and access to quality behavioral health care are essential to the health and wellness of all communities. This landing page serves as a resource for community health and wellness leaders across the country.

Offer support and treatment for individuals with behavioral health disorders who have been released from detention centers.

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Articles from Netsmart

Real-Time Alerts Enable HHUNY to Improve Transitions for Incarcerated Individuals

Netsmart

Friday, Jan. 17

Netsmart and Health Homes of Upstate New York (HHUNY) announced the expansion of their collaboration together, to include the incorporation of real-time justice system alerts designed to improve transitions for individuals entering and exiting correctional facilities.

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Power in Collaboration: Co-Responder Program Partners with Local Law Enforcement

Netsmart

Wednesday, September 18

The Mental Health Co-Responder Program works in collaboration with law enforcement by sending a mental health professional onsite when officers respond to a call where a mental health issue has been identified. The co-responder works alongside law enforcement by engaging with the individual and conducting an assessment onsite. Co-responders then follow up with the individual to either ensure the crisis has been settled or to discuss local treatment options.

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Long-term Advocacy Effort Pays Off with Patient-Centered Changes to 42 CFR Part 2 Privacy Regulations

Netsmart

Monday, March 30

Persons with a substance use disorder (SUD) or history of SUD treatment will now have easier access to fully-informed, comprehensive healthcare with passage of the Protecting Jessica Grubb’s Legacy Act, included in the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act passed by Congress and signed into law by the President on Friday, March 27. The Protecting Jessica Grubb’s Legacy Act promotes health equity and coordinated care for persons with SUD by modifying the decades old 42 CFR Part 2 privacy regulations.

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Additional Articles and Trends


Caring for Denver Foundation Approves Grants to Support City First Responders and Co-Responders

The Denver Police Department (DPD), in partnership with Mental Health Center of Denver (MHCD), will expand the existing co-responder program that assists Denver residents in mental health and/or substance misuse crisis through $2.2 million in grant funding.

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Colorado Behavioral Health Task Force

The mission of the task force is to evaluate and set the roadmap to improve the current behavioral health system in the state. The task force is comprised of 25 members. There are also three subcommittees with 25 members each, including State Safety Net, Children’s Behavioral Health and Long-Term Competency.

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SUD Teletherapy - Bridging the Treatment Gap

Treating substance user disorders via teletherapy is growing, meeting the needs of hard-to-reach individuals and communities, and social workers are part of that expansion.

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Protecting Jessica Grubb’s Legacy Act Updates 42 CFR Part 2

Persons with a substance use disorder (SUD) or history of SUD treatment will have easier access to fully informed, comprehensive healthcare with the passage of the Protecting Jessica Grubb’s Legacy Act (The Legacy Act). The Legacy Act was included in the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act passed by Congress and signed into law on March 27, 2020.

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Reducing Mental Illness in Rural Jails

The goal of this publication is to provide rural county leaders with ideas and strategies for addressing these challenges by providing examples of counties that have successfully done so or are making progress. There is no one strategy that will work for all counties, or all rural counties. But county leaders are encouraged to learn from each other’s experiences and adapt their peers’ policies, practices and programs to fit the needs of their county and residents.

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Tri-County Crisis Intervention Team

The crisis intervention team (CIT) is an innovative, police-based first responder program of pre-arrest jail diversion for those in a mental illness crisis. This program provides law enforcement-based crisis intervention training for helping those individuals with mental illness. Involvement in CIT is voluntary and based in the patrol division of the police department. In addition, CIT works in partnership with those in mental health care to provide a system of services that is friendly to the individuals with mental illness, family members, and the police officers.

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Mental Health Diversion Program

The Mental Health Diversion Program is a post-arrest, pre-plea diversion program for those with unmet mental health needs, arrested for low level non-Victim Rights Act offenses in four pilot sites. After arrest, mental health screening and assessment identify participants to divert from routine criminal case processing to mental health and/or psychiatric treatment. Successful completion of the six-month diversion period requires no new criminal charges and initiation of treatment. The outcome for successful participation is dismissal or non-filing of criminal charges.

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Integral Care Hospital and Jail Diversion Program

This program provides overnight mental health crisis support for adults in a safe 31-bed facility. Services include mental health crisis care, case management, emotional support, medicine and connection to Integral Care programs and local resources for ongoing support and recovery. Referrals are made by our Mobile Crisis Outreach Team, our Psychiatric Emergency Services and local hospitals.

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MHMR of Tarrant County Mental Health Diversion Program

The Mental Health Diversion Program (MHDP) is a pre-trial, post-booking specialty court program for participants in the criminal justice system that have a previous mental health history.  The program is judicially supervised, and the mission is to provide participants the resources and support to attain emotional well-being and a foundation for long-term success

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L.A. County Can Help Thousands of Mentally Ill Inmates Avoid Arrest and Homelessness

More than 60% of the inmates with a mental illness in the Los Angeles County Jail would be eligible for diversion if there were more facilities capable of providing supportive care. Such a move would save the county hundreds of dollars a day in incarceration costs for each inmate and, for many, end a cycle of being arrested and released, then becoming homeless and getting arrested again.

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Community Resources