Tuesday, June 19 | Cause Connected, Human Services

#MHM2018: How Do You Rate Your Mental and Emotional Health? 

By Mary Gannon, Chief Nursing Officer

Almost daily, we talk and hear about the importance of eating right and exercising. But when it comes to our mental health, it can sometimes be hard to discuss.

The fact is mental health issues are common and treatable. Anyone can experience mental or emotional health challenges, and during our lifetimes, many of us will. The latest research shows that one in five adults in the U.S. are affected by mental health conditions in a given year.

As we celebrate Mental Health Month, it’s important to assess your mental health because it affects how you think, feel and act. There is no shame in asking for help or weakness in acknowledging that you may need help. Can you recognize the signs and symptoms of mental health concerns? Are you seeking help as soon as you need it?

By acknowledging that you don’t feel quite right and acting early to get prompt and effective treatment, you can prevent many mental illnesses from progressing or obstructing your life

Source: National Alliance on Mental Illness

HOW TO GET HELP:

  1. Contact your employer’s Employee Assistance Program.
  2. Call the number on your insurance card to find a mental health provider.
  3. Talk to your doctor.

 

 

Meet the Author

Mary Gannon Blog Photo
Mary Gannon · Chief Nursing Officer

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